INFLAMMAGING: HOW INFLAMMATION AND MENOPAUSE AFFECT YOUR HEALTH (AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT)

Inflammaging is a chronic inflammatory state that develops as you age. Changes in oestrogen and progesterone can increase inflammation and cause symptoms you didn’t have before such as aches, pains, and skin changes. Known as inflammaging, this state of chronic inflammation continues as you age and can negatively impact your health. But if you understand what inflammaging is, you can make changes to minimise it and reduce long-term risks.

WHAT CAUSES INFLAMMAGING?

Inflammation itself isn’t bad. It’s a normal, healthy response designed to protect and heal your body after injury or illness. This type of inflammation is called acute inflammation. However, problems arise when our body stays in this state once the injury or illness have passed. This is known as chronic inflammation. There are several reasons why your immune system may stay in this reactive state instead of calming down, including:

• Physical and emotional stress
• Menopausal hormonal changes
• Smoking
• An unbalanced diet
• Lack of sleep
• Being inactive

CAN THE MENOPAUSE CAUSE INFLAMMATION?


Inflammatory symptoms like joint pain, arthritic flares, or fibromyalgia are common when you enter the menopause. It’s common to see the effects on inflammaging on our skin health too – you might notice increased redness, itchiness, sensitivity and dryness. It’s no coincidence that these uncomfortable symptoms develop as your oestrogen and progesterone levels go down. Research shows that this drop in hormone levels affects how your body manages inflammation.

REDUCING THE EFFECTS OF INFLAMMAGING:
FIVE ANTI-INFLAMMATORY TIPS

Inflammatory symptoms like joint pain, arthritic flares, or fibromyalgia are common when you enter the menopause. It’s common to see the effects on inflammaging on our skin health too – you might notice increased redness, itchiness, Although you can’t stop menopause from happening, there are ways to reduce inflammation and its effects on how your body ages. Diet and lifestyle changes can help combat menopause inflammation and keep you healthy as you age.
Here are five things you can do to minimise inflammaging and its effects:

1. Eat anti-inflammatory foods
Replace pro-inflammatory foods like fast food, fried food, crisps, biscuits and pastries with anti-inflammatory foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, and mushrooms.
2. Exercise
Engage in moderate-to-vigorous activities to stimulate anti-inflammatory immune responses, which along with diet, make it easier to maintain a healthy weight during the menopause.
3. Reduce stress
Make time each day to do something relaxing that you enjoy. Stress can lead to inflammation over time if it’s not kept in check.
4. Get enough sleep.
Aim for six to eight hours of sleep per night to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Chronic inflammation is more likely when you don’t sleep enough, so make sure you have the best environment for good rest every night.
5. Use skincare products designed to help with menopause.
If you’re struggling to keep skin symptoms at bay, you might need to rethink your skincare routine. Using ingredients that are gentle on the skin and work to nourish and repair are your best bet. CBD is a wonder ingredient that has been clinically proven to help reduce the appearance of the effects of inflammation.
progesterone levels go down. Research shows that this drop in hormone levels affects how your body manages inflammation.
Results may vary / may not be typical

PRODUCTS FOR YOUR ANTI-INFLAMMAGING SKIN REGIME

The Vive CBD Skincare range contain powerful active ingredients to balance, nourish and protect your skin. Each product contains high levels of their CBD Tri-Active Formula, engineered specifically for menopausal skin. The formula makes use of the triple-action of three antioxidant and anti-inflammatory elements and is therefore able to respond effectively to problems caused by inflammaging.

Don’t let inflammaging rule your life - discover VIVE products today.
Important: This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information does not constitute medical advice and it should not be relied upon as such. Consult with your doctor before modifying your regular medical regime.